The 10 Most Stunning Sights To See In Reykjavik

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Reykjavik is the world’s northernmost capital, and though small, it’s one of the most interesting and beautiful cities in Europe. Situated on the edge of the Arctic Circle, Reykjavik experiences only a few hours of sunlight during the winter months, but the long summer days more than make up for it. Reykjavik is a city of contrasts, where old meets new and where nature is never far away.

1. Hallgrímskirkja

Hallgrímskirkja is one of Reykjavik’s most iconic buildings and can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. The church is named after Iceland’s most famous poet and clergyman, Hallgrímur Pétursson, and was designed by Guðjón Samúelsson, Iceland’s state architect from 1924 to 1951. Construction of the church began in 1945 and was finally completed in 1986. at 74.5 meters tall, Hallgrímskirkja is the tallest building in Iceland and offers stunning views over the city from its tower.

2. The Sun Voyager

The Sun Voyager is a steel sculpture designed by Jón Gunnar Árnason and situated on the waterfront in Reykjavik. The sculpture was inspired by the Viking ships that once sailed the seas around Iceland and is meant to represent the spirit of exploration and discovery. The Sun Voyager is also a popular spot for weddings, as it offers a beautiful and unique setting for photos.

3. The Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon is one of Iceland’s most popular tourist attractions and is located just a short drive from Reykjavik. The lagoon is fed by the water from the nearby geothermal power plant and is rich in minerals, making it a perfect place to relax and rejuvenate. The lagoon is also said to have healing properties, particularly for those suffering from skin conditions.

4. The Glacier Lagoon

The Glacier Lagoon is another of Iceland’s must-see attractions. Located in the south of the country, the lagoon is fed by the melting water from the nearby Vatnajökull glacier, Europe’s largest glacier. The lagoon is home to a variety of wildlife, including seals, and is a popular spot for whale watching.

5. Geysir

Geysir is a geothermal area in the southwest of Iceland and is home to a number of hot springs and geysers, the most famous of which is Strokkur. Strokkur erupts every few minutes, shooting a column of water up to 30 meters into the air. Geysir is also a popular spot for hiking and horseback riding.

6. Gullfoss

Gullfoss is one of Iceland’s most popular waterfalls and is located in the Golden Circle, a popular tourist route that also includes Geysir and Thingvellir National Park. The waterfall is fed by the glacial river Hvítá and plunges 32 meters into a canyon below. Gullfoss is best seen from the viewing platform, which offers stunning views of the waterfall and the canyon.

7. Thingvellir National Park

Thingvellir National Park is located in the Golden Circle and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The park is home to a number of important historical and archaeological sites, as well as a beautiful landscape of glaciers, rivers, and lava fields. Thingvellir is also the site of the world’s first parliament, which was founded in 930 AD.

8. Vatnajökull

Vatnajökull is Europe’s largest glacier and covers 8% of Iceland’s landmass. The glacier is home to a number of glaciers, including the famous Eyjafjallajökull, which erupted in 2010 and caused widespread disruption to air travel. Vatnajökull is a popular spot for glacier hiking and ice climbing and is also the starting point for many of Iceland’s popular glacier tours.

9. Hvítárvatn

Hvítárvatn is Iceland’s largest lake and is located in the south of the country, just a short drive from Reykjavik. The lake is fed by the glacial river Hvítá and is a popular spot for fishing, swimming, and boating. Hvítárvatn is also home to a number of geothermal springs, which can be found along the shores of the lake.

10. Reykjavik

Reykjavík is the capital and largest city of Iceland. The city is home to a number of museums, galleries, and theaters. Reykjavík is also the site of the world’s first geothermal power plant, which was built in 1930.